Touch (Screenshot: YouTube)

Can a single film appeal to all five senses? Movies exist primarily to stimulate the viewer’s sense of sight and (from 1927’s The Jazz Singer onward) sound. There have been various attempts, including Smell-O-Vision and Odorama, to add olfactory sensations to the cinematic experience. And shows like Dinner And A Movie manage to excite the spectator’s taste buds as well. But what about the sense of touch? Aldous Huxley theorized some form of entertainment called “feelies” in his 1932 novel Brave New World, and there was also See You Next Wednesday and its remarkable “Feel-Around” gimmick.

Meanwhile, movies offer a whole range of tactile sensations, as evidenced by a new supercut from Now You See It host Jack Nugent simply entitled “Touch.” The premise could not be more basic. For a minute and a half, movie characters just touch things, including each other. Rings are fondled. Couches are caressed. And that fake, ferocious CGI tiger from Life Of Pi looks positively cuddly.

Charmingly set to the strains of “You N’ I” by Rainlord, which samples “Oh Lori” by the Alessi Brothers, the supercut draws on a pleasing variety of films, ranging from 1931’s City Lights, in which Virginia Cherrill’s blind flower girl tenderly touches Charlie Chaplin’s face, to 2015’s Star Wars: The Force Awakens, in which John Boyega gets to learn what a lightsaber feels like. Animated films are depicted as well, including snippets from Finding Nemo and Spirited Away. Despite a few tense moments from Midnight Cowboy, Raging Bull, and Harry Potter And The Goblet Of Fire, this is a primarily gentle supercut. Even Fight Club is represented by a moment in which Helena Bonham Carter and Edward Norton hold hands, rather than, say, the scene with Norton beating the living crap out of Jared Leto in some dank basement.

Advertisement

[via Laughing Squid]