(Photo: Pool / Getty Images)

Now that we’re into his second 100 days in office, it seems like a good moment to look back nostalgically at the good times of the Trump presidency—i.e., the first few hours after his inauguration, when he and his staff were too busy moving stuff into their new offices to actually enact any policies. But they weren’t too busy to get creepily invested in the size of Trump’s inauguration crowds, or for the newly installed president to grab his Junior Mystery Solvers magnifying glass so that he could help investigate the people who said his weren’t as big as the ones who came out to celebrate Barack Obama.

Specifically, Trump apparently spent some of the early moments of his presidency pestering the National Park Service, whose Twitter account retweeted a picture showing the crowd of Trump attendees dwarfed by those who came out to see Obama’s inauguration. Per a Freedom Of Information Act request initially reported on by MuckRock, Trump personally contacted Acting Director Mike Reynolds about the retweet, while the Service initiated its own manhunt to find the culprit. (Their efforts tracked the IP to somewhere in California, but no one seems to have been caught or punished for the act.) To be fair, there does seem to have been some worry that the Service’s account had been compromised—following the old dictum that states that “They who control the NPS Twitter account, control the world”—but it mostly comes off as Trump being, as ever, way more invested in the number of people cheering for him than in actually doing the job he so heartily professed to want.

[via CBS News]