(Image via Instagram)

Chief Keef is just 19 years old but already an accomplished rapper, child-support avoider, and fringe bystander at shootings. As a teenager who is also a wildly successful person, he has that rare knowledge of what “the kids” are into, combined with the ability to cater to those interests in an impactful way. So it should come as no surprise that he planned to stage a “live” benefit concert in Hammond, Indiana, projecting himself in hologram form all the way from Los Angeles. Young people love holograms—just ask the Coachella 2012 crowd.

Unfortunately, the concert was shut down by Hammond police just one song into the whole virtual affair. It was staged to raise money for the families of Dillan Harris and Melvin “Capo” Carr, the former a toddler hit and killed by a car involved in the drive-by murder of Carr, an associate of Chief Keef. The benefit was originally supposed to be held in Keef’s native Chicago, but that proved to be difficult, as he has various outstanding arrest warrants in the city, and the concert was therefore postponed because it “posed a significant public safety risk.” The venue was then moved across state lines to nearby Hammond, Indiana and its daylong hip-hop festival Craze Fest, but authorities still warned those organizers not to host a Chief Keef concert at all, hologram or otherwise.

Alki David, who recently signed Chief Keef to a record deal, blasted Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel after the show was canceled for “shutting down a voice that can create positive change in a community in desperate need” and “taking away money that could have gone to help the victims’ families.” For good measure, he closed his statement by threatening “to sue your asses.” The silver lining to the situation is that Chief Keef was able to get his hit “I Don’t Like” in before police shut his hologram self down, ensuring that all festival-goers still got to hear (sort of) firsthand about all the snitches, bitches, etc., that he’s not terribly fond of.

[via Rolling Stone]