(Photo: Twitter)

Here’s a fun fact: Roughly 2 million trees have been cut down to print copies of Fifty Shades Of Grey, British author E.L. James’ bestselling BDSM romance. (That’s based off 125 million copies sold, and an estimate of about 62.5 books per tree.) And as part of the natural life cycle of popular literature, many of those former firs and pulped pines have now made their way to the thrift stores and consignment shops of the world, where they’re now gathering dust and mold. (Apparently, nobody wants to buy a sweaty-palm-stained copy of a novel that their mother might once have owned, bosom quivering at the thought of a riding crop being slapped across her matronly thighs.)

That presents something of a conundrum for the employees of those shops, who are now faced with an excess of physically heavy, content-light porn that they’re basically unable to sell. At least one team of intrepid resale artists have found a way around it, though, returning the former wood to a more noble, protective state. That is, they built a fort out of used copies of the book:

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That’s from an Oxfam shop in Wales, whose proprietors would appreciate it if people would kindly cut it out. “We appreciate all the donations,” the store’s manager told interviewers, “But less Fifty Shades and more ’60s and ’70s vinyl would be good.” He then presumably looked around for someone to high-five, as that’s the kind of material that absolutely kills at thrift-store manager open mics.

[via Jezebel]