Photo: John Phillips (Getty Images)

Now that it, you know, actually exists, Terry Gilliam’s The Man Who Killed Don Quixote is refusing to tempt god by wasting time lining up its world debut. As reported by Little White Lies, Gilliam’s long-gestating, then dead, then-gestating-again fantasy will serve as the Closing Film at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, finally airing to the movie-going public on May 19.

Given all the noise and controversy surrounding its recent decision to functionally exclude Netflix from this year’s competition, Cannes could definitely use a big, much-anticipated feature to get people focused back on film. And, while Gilliam’s recent track record (and public comments on the #MeToo movement) call into question how warm a reception Quixote will actually receive, it’s impossible to deny that there’s something epic in his having finally finished a film that took him nearly 20 years, untold millions of dollars, and a great deal of personal hardship to make, that should make it a compelling capstone to this year’s fest. (Alternatively, if the earth rises up and swallows the theater to stop Gilliam’s movie from ever being seen, that would probably make a lot of headlines, too.)

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