Photo: Sebastien Nogier (Getty Images)

You’d be forgiven for losing track of every detail of the topography of America’s long, bumpy road from November 2016 to the present day, a shitty road trip where every whispered city name provokes an impromptu game of “School Shooting, White Supremacist Rally, or Poisoned Water Supply?” Still, “Charlottesville” is one of those names that continues to resonate nine months after crowds of white supremacists crowded into the Virginia city—and after Donald Trump made his priorities on these matters crystal clear by attempting to blame “both sides” for the violence that eventually broke out.

It’s something that filmmaker Spike Lee certainly hasn’t gotten hazy on; Lee lashed out at Trump over his comments this week at the Cannes International Film Festival, where he’s been busy promoting his new film BlacKkKlansman. True to form, the writer-director minced no words in his assessment of Trump’s behavior in the wake of this show of force from America’s asshole-right:

We have a guy in the White House, I’m not even going to say his fucking name. Whose defining moment—it was not just for Americans, but for the world—and that motherfucker was given a chance to say, ‘We are about love, and not hate.’ And that motherfucker did not denounce the fucking Klan, the ‘alt-right,’ and those Nazi motherfuckers. It was a defining moment, and he could have said to the world, ‘Not the United States.’ That we were better than that.

Lee’s film opens in the U.S. on August 10, 2018—the first anniversary of the Charlottesville violence. Starring Adam Driver and John David Washington, the film includes real-world footage from the rallies, including the moment when a supporter on the “alt-right” side of the day’s ugly equation drove his car into counter-protester Heather Heyer, killing her.