Screenshot: The Legend Of Zelda: Breath Of The Wild/Nintendo

We’re less than two weeks away from the release of The Legend Of Zelda: Breath Of The Wild, and the specifics of its vast open world largely remain a mystery. Here’s what we know: It’s really big, vaguely post-apocalyptic, and full of goblins, horses, and bird people. Thanks to the ESRB, the MPAA-like organization that provides games with their age ratings, we just got a weird little tidbit about what awaits players in the latest iteration of Hyrule. While Breath Of The Wild is rated E10+—which puts it in line with most Zeldas and more family friendly than Twilight Princess, the series’ grimmest and darkest entry—it marks the first time the series is being dinged for “Use Of Alcohol.” Odds are Link himself won’t be imbibing, but according to the ESRB’s rating summary, “during the course of the game, a shop owner tells Link that she only serves ‘drinks that are definitely just for adults’” and “players can also encounter a drunken character that occasionally hiccups.” There’s also a mention of “fairies with moderate cleavage and/or exaggerated-size breasts,” but, as many pervy little boys who were coming of age when playing Ocarina Of Time would tell you, that’s not exactly something new.

Nintendo has a long history of wiping away any mentions of potentially controversial topics in its games, especially alcohol and religion, the latter of which has been an issue for Zelda ever since Link’s shield lost its cross on the way to America back in 1986. But Nintendo has grown up quite a bit since then, and Zelda has actually played host to nods toward alcohol before. One of Link’s bases of operation in Twilight Princess is a back-alley bar, and Majora’s Mask contains a whole plot line about a forbidden “vintage milk” known as Chateau Romani, which players are told should only be consumed by adults. If the player is able to sneak into the bar where it’s served, they’ll encounter one of the dastardly Gorman brothers who asks if it’s possible for milk to get you tipsy—between hiccuping and slamming his fists on the bar. It just goes to show: It’s only an ESRB infraction if you get caught.

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[via Polygon]