Photo: Jemal Countess (Getty Images)

Even though they make incredible amounts of money, appear on room-filling movie screens, and attend awards ceremonies draped in jewels and the world’s finest clothes, celebrities, we must always remember, are just like us. If you find this hard to believe, consider this relatable story—one shared by Russell Crowe during an appearance on The Howard Stern Show—of the time when he, just as we all have, drunkenly bought a dinosaur skull from Leonardo DiCaprio.

During an interview with Stern yesterday, Crowe recounts buying the dino head, noting that “there was a bunch of vodka involved in that transaction,” as there typically is when spending large amounts of money on fossils. Crowe remembers DiCaprio wanting to sell off one incredible, fossilized skull because he was interested in purchasing a different one, and that it was sold to Crowe for what DiCaprio paid for it.

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“I think he paid like 30 or 35 grand or something for it,” Crowe says.

Stern is surprised it wasn’t more expensive because he, Crowe, and DiCaprio are normal folks like us who think nothing of dropping many peoples’ yearly income on a vodka-fueled dinosaur skull impulse buy.

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“No,” Crowe says, laughing about the bargain basement fossil. “It was not a very popular dinosaur.”

Still, trash dino or not, Crowe explains that he bought the bones for a good cause. “Part of the reason for buying it is that...my kids, particularly my eldest, were fascinated and they were into dinosaurs,” Crowe explains. “So, there you go. Here’s one for the playroom.”

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This is not the first time we’ve heard of Crowe’s dinosaur skull. It went up for sale alongside many other treasures accumulated in the Crowe’s Nest as part of last year’s The Art Of Divorce auction. (Again, the kind of event commonly held by people finalizing the end of a marriage.)

The Sotheby’s Australia listing confirms its DiCaprio provenance and helpfully explains that it’s the noggin bones of a Mosasaur—”a giant, serpentine marine reptile, which was prevalent during the Late Cretaceous Period, approximately 65 million years ago.”

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The page doesn’t list anything about the Mosasaur’s popularity, leading us to believe Crowe’s claim that it was a cheap, garbage creature whose bones all of us, just like our favorite celebrities, may one day have an opportunity to throw into the playrooms of our children.

[via Vulture]

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