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Pop culture obsessives writing for the pop culture obsessed.

Ramy gets to continue his spiritual (and sometimes chaotic) journey for a 3rd season

Illustration for article titled iRamy/i gets to continue his spiritual (and sometimes chaotic) journey for a 3rd season
Photo: Hulu

And now for a little good (perhaps great) news: Hulu has just renewed Ramy for a third season. Per a recent release, Hulu has granted Golden Globe winner Ramy Youssef’s widely beloved dramedy another 10-episode turn. Youssef writes for and stars in the Peabody-winning series while also serving as the show’s executive producer and co-creator.

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Ramy’s fairly predicted renewal comes after a critically acclaimed second season, which premiered in May. Picking up after his trip to Cairo, the second season follows the titular character’s steadily deepening interest in his faith as he connects with Sheikh Ali (Mahershala Ali) and the sheikh’s daughter, Zainab (MaameYa Boafo). In an effort to cultivate a more spiritual life, Ramy struggles to find a fitting equilibrium between his understanding of his Muslim roots and the secular life he’s always known, which sometimes results in too-quick judgments and bouts of over-correction. Overall, Ramy is often heralded as one of the more nuanced portrayals of Muslim culture to date, which is partly why we recently dubbed it one of the best shows of the year so far. Here’s a snippet from Saloni Gajjar’s review of Ramy’s “moving” second season for The A.V. Club:

The exceptional first season of Hulu’s Ramy established its protagonist, Egyptian American Ramy Hassan, as a quiet, perpetually confused man who often finds it challenging to balance both sides of his hyphenated identity. He knows he wants to be a good Muslim and is really struggling to get to that point. Even so, he’s committed to understanding his faith and roots. The show stands out amidst a sea of new comedies in the last few years—especially those hailing from young comedians with a singular voice—because of creator Ramy Youssef’s distinct lens and the way his on-screen character relies on religion for guidance. In a great second season, the show doubles down on this with extreme enthusiasm. Despite a couple of misses in the middle, season two is a remarkable experience that retains Ramy’s charming storytelling and comedic nuances.

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