Pop culture obsessives writing for the pop culture obsessed.
Pop culture obsessives writing for the pop culture obsessed.
Illustration for article titled Oscar Isaac to produce, star in Brian K. Vaughan adaptation iThe Great Machine/i
Photo: Ethan Miller/FilmMagic (Getty Images)

It’s an enduring source of frustration for a particular class of comic fan that, despite both the consistency and popularity of his work, only a single one of Brian K. Vaughan’s comic projects has ever been successfully adapted for film or TV. (His youth-oriented Marvel series Runaways, which he co-created with Adrian Alphona, for those of you keeping track.) But while the difficulties of getting Y: The Last Man (coming some time on FX, we swear to fuckin’ Christ) off the page are endlessly well-documented at this point, and Saga remains little more than a fever dream, it sounds like another one of his comic adaptations is now suddenly in much better shape.

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THR reports that Oscar Isaac has just signed on to both star in and produce The Great Machine, an adaptation of Vaughan’s 2004 comic about a technological superhero who drops out of fighting crime in order to become mayor of New York. Mixing high-concept superhero stuff—hero Mitchell Hundred can talk to and control machines, and ends up in fights with unstable enemies with a similar host of powers—and real-world political issues, it’s one of Vaughan’s murkiest works to date, backed up with gorgeously moody art from co-creator Tony Harris.

It’s also worth noting that the comic in question is actually titled Ex Machina, which has nothing to do with the other movie Isaac starred in called Ex Machina, and now, oops, we’re trapped in an Ex Machina loop, Ex Machina Ex Machina. But worry not, dear Ex Machinas, we should be able to wrap our Ex Machinas around this Ex Machinaly.

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The Great Machine is being produced at Legendary; meanwhile, Isaac recently starred in Disney’s latest space-based blockbuster, Star Wars: The Rise Ex Machina.

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