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Listen good, pal, because we’ve gotta get this news right the first time around, y’hear? You know what Nic Cage’ll do to us otherwise? Beat our teeth out, then kick us in the stomach for mumbling. And I can afford a blemish on my character, but not on my clothes, so let’s get down to it.

We previously reported Nicolas Cage had signed on to voice the character of Spider-Man Noir in the upcoming animated film Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse. Of all the gin joints in all the world, Cage had to walk into the movie where there are numerous Spider-Mans from different dimensions, and his role would be that of a Spidey who is more of the hardbitten film noir type, unafraid to do more than give bad guys a little chin music, yeah? And in a new interview with Entertainment Weekly, Cage explained his technique for portraying the character, and it is a very Nic Cage answer. Which is a damn good thing, sweetheart, because let me tell you, when your head says one thing and your whole life says another, your head always loses:

There are multiple Spider-Men in different dimensions that are kind of colliding together. My character’s Spider-Man Noir. He’s really Peter Parker from the ’30s. I tried to channel those noir films with [Humphrey] Bogart, and have those kinds of sounds that he might make with [James] Cagney, or Edward G. Robinson, that kind of way of talking. I tried to give the character that. It was a lot of fun. I think it should be quite funny. The movie definitely has a sense of humor, and that’s a good thing because it’s good for the whole family.

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Yes, when Cage was told his character had “noir” in the name, he knew he had to go full nouveau shaman and channel Bogart. But he’s not wrong: This is definitely a “good for the whole family” kind of film, what with Spider-Gwen and the Spectacular Spider-Ham making appearances. Hell, this just confirms our suspicions that Cage will enrich the movie, maybe even make it a surefire winner, yeah? True, there’s no guaranteed way to win, kid. But there’s a way to lose more slowly.