Photo: Pascal Le Segretain (Getty Images)

One of the most common complaints about any streaming service—especially as more and more content becomes spread out across different outlets—is that all of this stuff is just too darn cheap. Month after month, some people still have money left over for things like food and medicine, which is simply not ideal in 2018. You either have to dedicated your life to keeping up with all media, or you have to be one of those people who goes outside and does other things with their time. Thankfully, Netflix is once again looking out for all of us, as CNET is reporting that the company is currently testing a new subscription tier in some markets that will offer HDR video and 4K streaming on four simultaneous devices, and all for slightly more money than the current highest subscription tier.

Basically, if you wanted to watch Queer Eye on as many screens as possible in the highest quality imaginable, this would be the plan for you. It’s called “Ultra,” and the HDR video option seems to be its only advantage over the existing “Premium” plan—though some reports say that the Premium plan would also drop from four simultaneous devices to two. The testing is being done in European markets, but The Verge expects that the Ultra plan would cost about $17 per month in the U.S., compared to $14 per month for the Premium plan.

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Netflix has confirmed that this testing is happening, but it also notes that part of testing involves trying out different price points to see what customers are willing to pay. If this Ultra plan becomes a regular offering, it might not cost as much as it does currently in Germany and Italy. That being said, the more important thing to take away here is that Netflix definitely wants to keep charging more money for higher-quality streams, which is going to become more of a thing once these higher-quality streams become a thing. In other words, you might not care about an option to pay almost $20 for Netflix now, but you might in a few years when your Super TV isn’t as crisp as your neighbor’s Super TV.