Pop culture obsessives writing for the pop culture obsessed.
Pop culture obsessives writing for the pop culture obsessed.

Michael C. Hall seems confident that the Dexter revival will make up for the finale

Michael C. Hall
Michael C. Hall
Photo: Dimitrios Kambouris (Getty Images)

Dexter is one of those shows that has become entirely defined by its bad finale (or not), even more than Game Of Thrones or How I Met Your Mother, so it’s hardly surprising that pretty much all of the talk surrounding Showtime’s upcoming Dexter revival has actually been about the end of the show’s original run. Showrunner Clyde Phillips, who is returning for the revival, said in October that the revival won’t “undo” the finale but instead will serve as an opportunity to get it “right” and make “a second finale.” For those who missed it last time and have somehow avoided all of the online complaining, Dexter originally ended with everyone’s favorite serial killer hiding away in the wilderness as a lumberjack, with the whole thing being pretty unsatisfying.

Now, Dexter himself—Michael C. Hall—has shared his own take on why he finally agreed to do a Dexter revival. Speaking with The Daily Beast, Hall said that the pitch for this revival was “intriguing in a way that it wasn’t before,” and apparently brings something new to the Dexter canon based on how long it’s been since the show originally ended. He also notes that he, like a lot of people, has wondered what Dexter would be up to these days and acknowledges that a lot of the criticisms of the finale were valid. The Daily Beast then brings up the excellent Six Feet Under finale, which Hall was also in, prompting him to point out that he’s “dabbled in the extremes of ‘extremely satisfying’ and ‘extremely dissatisfying’ television finales,” so it seems like he’s pretty comfortable with honestly addressing how the end of Dexter was received. He also used variations of “extreme” three times in that sentence, which is making us wonder if Dexter should be a snowboarder in the revival instead of a lumberjack.

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