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It's Rumor Time: Tarantino might be planning a Netflix extended cut for Once Upon A Time…In Hollywood

Photo: Andrew Cooper (Sony Pictures Entertainment)

Quentin Tarantino has been refreshingly candid about all the material he was forced to cut from his recent Once Upon A Time…In Hollywood, going so far as to include a credit for his old pal Tim Roth (cut) in the film’s closing crawl. That acknowledgment of edited scenes, actors, and more from the director’s sprawling 60s odyssey has led to a rumor circulating this week, suggesting that Tarantino might once again turn to Netflix—which currently hosts an extended miniseries version of his last movie, The Hateful Eight—to show all that cut footage off somewhere down the line. Now, one of OUATIH’s co-stars, Nicholas Hammond—who plays real-life actor-director/fringe jacket fan Sam Wanamaker in the film—has suggested that, yep, such an extended cut is probably on its way.

This is per The Playlist, which reports on an appearance Hammond recently made on the The Mutuals podcast, talking about his appearance in the film. According to Hammond—who, we feel like we should make clear, only appears in the film, and has no other connection to Tarantino, so take this all with a grain of salt—“There is talk about there being a 4-hour Netflix version, as well, because there were a lot of scenes he shot that couldn’t make it into the film because there just simply wasn’t room.” Hammond went on: “I think they’re talking about doing the same [as The Hateful Eight]. There are some actors like Tim Roth, wonderful actors, who never even made it into the film. I mean, their entire roles got cut.”

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Actors cut from the film include Roth, Danny Strong (playing Dean Martin), and James Marsden, who played a young Burt Reynolds. (Reynolds was also supposed to be in the film, playing ranch owner George Spahn; after his death, Bruce Dern took over the part.) Once Upon A Time is already a, let’s say, luxuriously paced film, clocking in at 161 minutes. But it’s also not hard to imagine audiences tuning in to the streaming service to check out an even more in-depth look at the world Tarantino so meticulously recreates.

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