Coming soon to a theater (to be determined later) near you: A feature-length documentary covering Iron Maiden's 2008 tour. A product of Canada's Banger Films, Iron Maiden: Flight 666 covers two months on the road and in the air as they, well, let's let the press release take it from here:

Circumnavigating the globe, the band flew in a specially customized Boeing 757 airliner with their crew and 12 tons of music and stage equipment on board, playing 23 sold out stadium and arena shows in Asia, Australia and North, Central and South America in just 45 days. They played in 13 countries, also landing in Azerbaijan and Papua New Guinea en route for fuel stops, travelling 70,000km and performing to almost half a million fans – a schedule that was only made possible by having their own “magic carpet” enabling them to go where they wanted with all the key elements of band, crew and equipment on board one plane, which was christened Ed Force One. Even more remarkable was that lead singer and Airline Captain Bruce Dickinson was not only to perform 23 shows, but he was also the pilot flying the plane for much of the way.

Yes, the plane was called Ed Force One. And the lead singer flew it himself (most of the time).

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That Dickinson was a pilot was news to us, which sent us to Dickinson's Wikipedia entry (which is about 3000 words longer than F. Scott Fitzgerald's entry). Toward the end there's a section dealing with his enthusiasm for fencing and flying, and has a habit of rescuing U.K. citizens stranded in sticky situations. Which is pretty sweet but, you know, in a totally metal way.