The punk and hardcore that came out of Washington, D.C. in the 1980s remains some of the greatest, most vital, and most inspirational music ever made. During that time, bands like Minor Threat, Void, Rites Of Spring, and Fugazi were formed, many of which would wind up becoming legendary. Much of that music was released on Dischord Records, but the sonic record doesn’t tell the whole story.

Filmmaker Scott Crawford is rectifying that with his new documentary Salad Days: A Decade Of Punk In Washington, D.C. (1980-’90). Using live footage, archival photographs, and interviews with D.C. punk scene vets such as Ian MacKaye, Henry Rollins, and Dave Grohl, Crawford tells the story of how a small band of misfit kids turned teen rebellion into a revolution—and how that revolution both failed and succeeded as the underground ’80s morphed into the alt-rock ’90s.

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The A.V. Club is proud to present two screenings of Salad Days at Alamo Drafthouse Denver: one tonight at 7:15 p.m. and an encore tomorrow night at 9:30 p.m. Tonight’s screening is SOLD OUT, so if you already have a ticket, you’ll get to see yours truly interview Crawford via Skype before the film—and you’ll also get to see Denver’s own Fugazi tribute band, Fauxgazi, play a free set in the theater directly after the film. If you DON’T have a ticket to tonight’s show, don’t fret: There are still seats available for Tuesday night’s screening, albeit without the interview or live band. Either way, Salad Days is not to be missed.

Salad Days at Alamo Drafthouse Denver

  • Monday, May 18, 7:15 p.m., featuring a Skype interview with filmmaker Scott Crawford conducted by The A.V. Club Senior Writer Jason Heller (This screening is SOLD OUT.)
  • Tuesday, May 19, 9:30 p.m. (Tickets for this screening are on sale here.)

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