Screenshot: YouTube

Flat-earthers, like creationists and chemtrails truthers, are a strange breed that make little sense to those who disagree with them. The ancient Greeks were among the first to realize that the world was round, but current flat-earth believers like NBA star Kyrie Irving, reality star Tila Tequila, as well as the entire Flat-Earth Society, would have you believe otherwise. That organization’s website is good for a bit of a laugh, as part of its reasoning includes discounting NASA outright:

There are a plethora of resources available that show us we can’t trust the photographic evidence from organizations such as NASA. Some of the evidences that these should be discounted include constant changes in their depiction of the Earth, inconsistent lighting in moon footage, and other irregularities which are discussed in depth by those who believe the Moon landing was a hoax.

If you’re looking to moon-landing conspiracists for backup, that’s likely a danger sign. But all the site’s diagrams showing how our flat planet rotates (flips?) into seasons are pretty funny.

Should you (god forbid) run into Tila Tequila at a club or something, Kottke has helpfully offered a video highlighting all the different ways that you can know for sure that the Earth is round. (There’s also a video by Carl Sagan, which should be proof enough for anyone.) One method involves climbing up a great height and looking over the horizon:

The higher up you are the farther you will see. Usually, we tend to relate this to Earthly obstacles, like the fact we have houses or other trees obstructing our vision on the ground, and climbing upwards we have a clear view, but that’s not the true reason. Even if you would have a completely clear plateau with no obstacles between you and the horizon, you would see much farther from greater height than you would on the ground. This phenomena is caused by the curvature of the Earth as well, and would not happen if the Earth was flat.


Your move, Tila Tequila.