Photo: Yuriko Nakao (Getty Images)

Hollywood’s taken some big steps forward in the realms of representation and transparency in the wake of the #MeToo movement, but that doesn’t change the fact that Bohemian Rhapsody, a boilerplate, problematic Queen biopic directed by someone who’s facing many, many, accusations of sexual assault, dominated the Golden Globes just one year after attendees wore all black as a show of solidarity to those impacted by a systemic culture of inequality, assault, and harassment.  

Despite its wins, though, there was no mention of Bryan Singer during the ceremony, nor was the director invited onstage when Bohemian Rhapsody was awarded Best Picture. Rami Malek, who won a Golden Globe last night for his portrayal of Freddie Mercury, didn’t include Singer in his speech, and steered away from questions regarding the director during interviews backstage. As Indiewire reports, Malek responded to a question about Singer by focusing on the legacy of Mercury.

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“The one thing we needed to do was celebrate Freddie Mercury in this film,” Malek said. “Nothing was going to compromise us and giving him the love and celebration he deserves.”

Singer, who was fired from the film near the end of shooting, still made his presence known, however, addressing his erasure in an Instagram post. The photo shows Singer overseeing Bohemian Rhapsody’s “I Want To Break Free” scene while sitting in a chair with “Director” emblazoned on its back. “What an honor,” he wrote. “Thank you #HollywoodForeignPress.”

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This morning, he also shared a video of star Rami Malek and the rest of the cast rehearing the film’s recreation of Queen’s iconic Live Aid performance. What had Twitter lit up, however, was a comment on Singer’s original post from Brett Ratner, the director and producer who, unlike Singer, has actually had to face consequences for his sordid history of sexual harassment and misconduct.

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“So happy for you brother!!” Ratner wrote, proving again the old adage that birds of a feather flock together.

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Singer’s next project is a “female-empowered” remake of 1985's Red Sonja, though that could change if Esquire’s rumored exposé on his behavior—one Singer preempted with denials this past fall—ever actually manifests.