Solo: A Star Wars Story
Photo: Disney/Lucasfilm

Solo: A Star Wars Story is due out May 25, after a somewhat rocky production that saw directors Phil Lord and Christopher Miller replaced by Ron Howard over creative differences with Lucasfilm, the removal of Michael K. Williams’ character, and reports that Alden Ehrenreich, the star of the spin-off, needed an on-set acting coach to help him embody everyone’s favorite space rogue. But it looks like they’ve steadied the ship, thanks in no small part to co-star Donald Glover, who’s effortlessly slipped into the role of Lando Calrissian, and Harrison Ford, who gave his successor “some vital insights into the character.”

Despite having gotten off to a rough start, this won’t be a solo outing for Ehrenreich. In an Esquire profile, the actor reveals the extent of his “commitment” to the spin-off franchise. When asked how many movies he’s signed on for, Ehrenreich says “three,” but according to the Esquire writer, “then flinches, understanding he may have just created a disturbance in the Force.” The actor continues: “I don’t know if that’s officially, uh, public. But—yeah.” Disney and Lucasfilm haven’t issued any statements yet about Ehrenreich’s comments, but we presume he’ll let a “that’s two you owe me, junior” slip when he’s at the bargaining table.

Ehrenreich also touched on Lord and Miller’s abrupt departure; apparently, the directors themselves broke the news to him.

They had mentioned there were some disagreements before, but they didn’t get into it. They wished me the best with the rest of the movie. On a personal level, it felt emotional, for them to be going after we’d set out on that course together. Because I spent a lot of time with them, and we had a really good relationship—they also cast me. But I think at that point, they were kind of on board with [the decision], too. Like, ‘This is what’s happening.’ That’s not what they said to me, but that was the vibe I got.”

The actor also clears up the reports about getting an assist from an acting coach during filming. Apparently, writer-director Maggie Kiley had been “part of conversations that happened for a couple weeks at one point, but that was basically it.” Esquire notes that Lord and Miller said Kiley acted as “a resource for the entire cast as well as themselves.”

Advertisement