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Adam McKay and Three Uncanny Four Productions are launching a Jeffrey Epstein podcast

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The news cycle is nowhere near done with the Jeffrey Epstein case, which is now taking the form of in-depth audio storytelling. The disgraced financier who allegedly killed himself while in prison for sex trafficking last month will be the subject of a new podcast. You can listen weekly to new episodes of Broken: Jeffrey Epstein starting this Thursday, September 5, presumably while lying on the ground in the fetal position, asking how in god’s name we found ourselves here.

According to the announcement, The New Yorker’s Ariel Levy will host it with featured appearances including The Miami Herald’s Julie K. Brown. Brown’s 2018 articles brought renewed scrutiny to Epstein’s 2008 plea deal which allowed him to evade federal charges and serve 13 months in the Palm Beach County Jail after he was accused of sexually abusing dozens of young women and girls.

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Broken: Jeffrey Epstein hails from the studio Three Uncanny Four Productions, which is headed by popular podcasters Adam Davidson and Laura Mayer and backed by Sony Music Entertainment. They have partnered with Adam McKay, known for his recent Oscar-winning movies Vice and The Big Short. Davidson, who was a co-creator of NPR’s Planet Money podcast, worked with McKay as a technical advisor on the latter film four years ago, which is when interest in the idea for this developed. They planned on waiting until Epstein’s trial to launch the podcast, but the process was hastened when Epstein hung himself on the morning of August 10 in his jail cell at the Metropolitan Correction Center in Manhattan, New York City.

With this podcast, the team wants to take a detailed look into his life, his powerful connections to the rich, and also uncover new developments in this years-long case. According to former WNYC producer Mayer, “[O]ne of the goals of the show is to explore the social context of Epstein’s crimes—the networks of power and money that allowed him to escape justice for so long.”

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